The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes

The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The sculptures were nice and you can see there has been quite a bit of effort put into some of them, but with the others you kind of wonder if there was any effort put in at all (like the busts and 2D comic covers).  Amongst the best sculptures were the 3D comic book covers, the animated version of Batman, and the Batmobiles.

The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes

There was an intro video talking about how the artist, Nathan Sawaya, wanted to represent the duality of good and evil, and “don’t be surprised to see villains”.  Sadly the only villain was the Joker and there was only one sculpture respectively of Harley Quinn, the Penguin, the Riddler, Deathstroke, and a couple of busts.  There was only one sculpture that really represented the theme of duality that Nathan spoke of.  He mentioned in his intro how Superman wouldn’t be Superman if Lex Luthor wasn’t around, yet he didn’t make a single sculpture of Lex Luthor.

The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes

The sculptures were repetitive and mostly only the main Justice League squad (minus Martian Manhunter and Hawk Girl) in heroic poses with the main focus being on Batman and Superman.  A few of the rooms felt like filler rooms and one room just served to invoke our trypophobia.

The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes

It’s interesting to note that Nathan Sawaya also mentioned how he thinks there needs to be more female representation in comics, yet he didn’t include many of the well-known strong female characters!  It would have been great to see an action pose of Catwoman, Harley Quinn and Poison Ivy together, for example.  Alas all we got was an odd sculpture of Harley Quinn meditating, meant to “subvert our expectations”, and a sculpture of Catwoman in a cat pose.  The few sculptures of Wonder Woman were not nearly as dynamic as the male sculptures such as the Flash and Green Lantern.

The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes

I would have liked to have seen the different incarnations of Batman, a decent rendition of Wonder Woman, a representation of the struggle between Superman and Doomsday, something arty about Aquaman (and how he’s more powerful than everyone gives him credit for), additional 3D comic cover sculptures, and the inclusion of more action/dynamic poses.

The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes


The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes

As a place to take your kids to, it’s not too bad, but bear in mind that they may get frustrated by the lack of interactivity.  That is until they get to the lego bricks on display in the gift shop (sorry, I meant the “Interactive Zone”) at the end.  Then good luck trying to get them to leave!

Overall it was alright, but it could have been better.  Much better.

The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes

If this review has piqued your curiosity about The Art of the Brick: DC Super Heroes then you can check out their site here and follow them on Twitter here.

By | 2017-12-15T14:30:52+00:00 25th October 2017|Categories: Art Reviews|0 Comments

Leave A Comment